Following:

The first women flight attendants, in 1930, were required to be single, trained nurses between the ages of 20 and 26, no more than 5 feet 4 inches tall and 118 pounds.

margartia:

fuckyeahfacts:

(World’s Greatest Book of Useless Information)

“Part of our emergency is that it’s so tempting to do this sort of thing now, to retreat to narrow arrogance, pre-formed positions, rigid filters, the ‘moral clarity’ of the immature. The alternative is dealing with massive, high-entropy amounts of info and ambiguity and conflict and flux; it’s continually discovering new areas of personal ignorance and delusion. In sum, to really try to be informed and literate today is to feel stupid nearly all the time and to need help. That’s about as clearly as I can put it…That last one’s of especial value, I think. As exquisite verbal art, yes, but also as a model for what free, informed adulthood might look like in the context of Total Noise: not just the intelligence to discern one’s own error or stupidity, but the humility to address it, absorb it, and move on and out therefrom, bravely, toward the next revealed error. This is probably the sincerest, most biased account of ‘Best’ your Decider can give: these pieces are models—not templates, but models—of ways I wish I could think and live in what seems to me this world.”

—David Foster Wallace (via tmblg)
DO WANT.
via thedailywhat:

Inhabitable Shopping Cart Design Concept of the Day: Artist Kevin Cyr’s fully-functional Camper Kart contains a collapsible two-person bedroom with a hard-top roof and ample storage space for cooking equipment.
Cyr says:

Camper Kart, partially funded by a FEAST grant is an experiment in autonomy. It investigates habitats and housing; recycling and ecology; exploration and mobility.

See Also: Camper Bike.
[h/t.]
DO WANT.
via thedailywhat:

Inhabitable Shopping Cart Design Concept of the Day: Artist Kevin Cyr’s fully-functional Camper Kart contains a collapsible two-person bedroom with a hard-top roof and ample storage space for cooking equipment.
Cyr says:

Camper Kart, partially funded by a FEAST grant is an experiment in autonomy. It investigates habitats and housing; recycling and ecology; exploration and mobility.

See Also: Camper Bike.
[h/t.]

DO WANT.

via thedailywhat:

Inhabitable Shopping Cart Design Concept of the Day: Artist Kevin Cyr’s fully-functional Camper Kart contains a collapsible two-person bedroom with a hard-top roof and ample storage space for cooking equipment.

Cyr says:

Camper Kart, partially funded by a FEAST grant is an experiment in autonomy. It investigates habitats and housing; recycling and ecology; exploration and mobility.

See Also: Camper Bike.

[h/t.]

thedailywhat:

Reimagination of the Day: The Simpsons interpreted as an average (?) Angolan family by the Luanda, Angola-based ad agency Executive Center on the occasion of the show’s upcoming debut in the sub-Saharan nation.
[via.]
thedailywhat:

Reimagination of the Day: The Simpsons interpreted as an average (?) Angolan family by the Luanda, Angola-based ad agency Executive Center on the occasion of the show’s upcoming debut in the sub-Saharan nation.
[via.]

thedailywhat:

Reimagination of the Day: The Simpsons interpreted as an average (?) Angolan family by the Luanda, Angola-based ad agency Executive Center on the occasion of the show’s upcoming debut in the sub-Saharan nation.

[via.]

somethingchanged:

Lego ad campaign. Imagination theme plays prominently in past ads too via designtumblelog: csessums, cyanatrendland
somethingchanged:

Lego ad campaign. Imagination theme plays prominently in past ads too via designtumblelog: csessums, cyanatrendland

somethingchanged:

Lego ad campaign. Imagination theme plays prominently in past ads too via designtumblelog: csessums, cyanatrendland

somethingchanged:

via andytlr
somethingchanged:

via andytlr

“In the interests, then, of peace; in the interests of commerce; in the interests of moral and material improvement, it may be asserted that interference in Afghanistan has now become a duty, and that any moderate outlay or responsibility we may incur in restoring order at Kabul will prove in the sequel to be true economy.”

—Sir Henry Rawlinson, 1868. Quoted by Rory Stewart in the London Review of Books debunking one of the few remaining consensus items in American and international politics: the idea that maintaining an Afghan counterinsurgency is or ever was a good idea.
colinmeloy:
I have the raddest wife & son ever.  One of their many collaborations…colinmeloy:
I have the raddest wife & son ever.  One of their many collaborations…

colinmeloy:

I have the raddest wife & son ever.  One of their many collaborations…

Uninsured idiot yahoo protesting against government healthcare gets injured in melee he caused, now needs to beg for money for medical bills, also doesn't have irony gene »

Barack’s Books, on the campaign trail and afterwards

What Is the What: The Autobiography of Valentino Achak Deng
by Dave Eggers.  
Politico, May 3

Netherland
by Joseph O’Neill.
The New York Times Magazine, May 03, 2009.

Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet
by Jeffrey D. Sachs.
The New York Times, December 16, 2008.

Lincoln: The Biography of a Writer
by Fred Kaplan.
National Journal, November 26, 2008.

Defining Moment: FDR’s Hundred Days and the Triumph of Hope
by Jonathan Alter.
The New York Times, November 18, 2008.

FDR
by Jean Edward Smith.
The New York Times, November 18, 2008.

Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001
by Steve Coll.
The New York Times, November 2, 2008.

Collected Poems, 1948 to 1984
by Derek Walcott.
The Daily Telegraph, November 7, 2008.

Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution—and How It Can Renew America
by Thomas L. Friedman.
Washington Independent, September 8, 2008.

Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age
by Larry Bartels.
MSNBC, September 3, 2008.

Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
by Doris Kearns Goodwin.
Time, June 18, 2008.

The Post-American World
by Fareed Zakaria.
The New York Times, May 21, 2008.

(via.)